Skip to main navigation Skip to main content
Our hearts are with all of the victims and families who have been impacted by the devastation of Hurricane Harvey. In the wake of this storm, we stand with our fellow neighbors with Hurricane Harvey Relief Resources to help those who have been displaced.

News/Events

Kentucky Housing Honors Achievements in Affordable Housing

For Immediate Release 

Contact:  Charla Jackson Peter

October 14, 2011

(502) 564-7630, ext. 454

Kentucky Housing Honors Achievements in Affordable Housing

On Thursday, October 13, awards honoring excellence in affordable housing were presented at the 2011 Kentucky Affordable Housing Conference in Lexington. 

Kentucky Housing Corporation (KHC), the conference host and state housing finance agency, sponsored the awards to honor builders, nonprofit organizations, and others who have made outstanding contributions to the state’s affordable housing industry in the last year. 

Becky Bleemel received the 2011 Homeownership Award for her outstanding service and innovative achievement in providing affordable homeownership solutions to Kentuckians.  Ms. Bleemel lets clients know they are her clients for life and not to hesitate to call her if any question or concern arises, even after the loan has closed.

The 2011 Nonprofit Organization Award was presented to Kentucky Domestic Violence Association (KDVA), which recently opened KDVA Homes, a project 5 years in the making.  KDVA Homes is 48 units of permanent supportive housing for domestic violence victims and their families who are at or below 60 percent of area median income.  The goal of the housing project is to help victims and their families become empowered and self-sufficient.  Units are located in four cities throughout the Commonwealth:  Louisville, Morehead, Murray, and Paducah.

Receiving the 2011 Nonprofit Affordable Housing Builder Award was Buckeye Community Hope Foundation, for outstanding service and contributions in building affordable housing for Kentuckians.  Buckeye Community Hope Foundation has developed more than 40 Low Income Housing Tax Credit projects, three HOPE VI planning grants, and two implementation grants in the early 1990’s.  They partnered with Kentucky Housing Corporation and several other entities to develop Walnut Forest, a rehabilitated 48-unit apartment complex in Franklin, Kentucky, and Taylorsville Place, a 24-unit, new construction complex in Taylorsville, Kentucky.

The 2011 Energy Efficiency Leadership Award was presented to Louisville Metro Housing Authority for steadfast leadership in implementing and coordinating strategies and solutions to improve energy efficiency in Kentucky homes.  The agency has aggressively invested in new and renovated energy efficient housing and offices throughout the city.  Their premier green site is Liberty Green, a HOPE VI Revitalization project currently nearing completion on six blocks in downtown Louisville. The site's name aptly describes the community's environmental standards.  Every rental and homeownership unit at the site is constructed per Energy Star efficiency guidelines and equipped with Energy Star labeled appliances, resulting in significant utility cost savings to residents.

Da-Ranco, Inc. received the 2011 For-Profit Affordable Housing Builder Award.  Da-Ranco works to assist homebuyers in south-central Kentucky, an area often overlooked by developers.  By using a mix of private bank funds and funds from the HOME Investment Partnerships Program, Da-Ranco helps many Kentuckians with disabilities.  Recently, the company completed a project housing modifying the living unit of a legally-blind couple to accommodate the couple's visual needs. The company also assisted an extremely low-income family of a 17-year-old girl who suffered a traumatic brain injury in an automobile accident 5 years ago.  The family's dilapidated mobile home was unfit for their daughter's extensive needs.  Da-Ranco stepped in and built the family a brand new, two-bedroom unit with full handicap access, allowing the family to bring their daughter home from a nursing care facility.      

J. Dale Sights was awarded the 2011 Homeless Leadership Award for providing steadfast leadership in implementing and coordinating strategies and solutions to end homelessness in Kentucky.  Mr. Sights is a successful businessman and a civic leader within his hometown community.  He is a member of the Governor’s Task Force for Recovery Kentucky and the CEO of the Women’s Addiction Recovery Manor (WARM).  Mr. Sights' passion for recovery is evident as he speaks about the WARM center and the many people who have rebuilt their lives through his intervention and placement into recovery centers.  As he walks down the halls of the WARM center, Mr. Sights addresses each individual by name and knows his or her story.  But for his wide reach and passion, many of the individuals who he encounters daily would be homeless.  He is a driving force of support in our state’s battle against homelessness.

The Mae Street Kidd Award is presented to an individual who has demonstrated outstanding public service and made great strides in promoting affordable housing for Kentuckians.  Don Clem started with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) in 1986, working in the former Assisted Housing Management Branch.  He retired as director of the Louisville HUD Office of Public Housing.  Mr. Clem is considered a top Housing Choice Voucher program analyst/adviser and coordinated much of the successful goal attainment of the Southeast Network of Public and Indian Housing.  He was most proud when he could translate program success into the number of families and individuals who received housing and/or services.

The recipient of the 2011 Dorothy J. Williams Lifetime Achievement Award, which is awarded to an individual who has devoted much of their career to helping make the dream of affordable housing a reality in Kentucky, was Abraham WilliamsMr. Williams started his career as the housing manager for the Phenix City Housing Authority in Alabama in 1977.  Managing 650 units of public housing, he created youth sports, elderly, after-school, and job opportunity programs.  In 1987, he became the housing director responsible for 1,092 housing units, 600 Section-8 units, and all educational, sporting, and elderly programs. 

Mr. Williams came to Kentucky in 1995 when he accepted the position as executive director of the Housing Authority of Bowling Green.  In his time there, Mr. Williams created a variety of programs, including homeownership, elderly, youth, and sports for housing residents, as well as the local community.

Also recognized was Ohio Capital Corporation for Housing for its contributions as a partnering agency in the conference.

“Many Kentuckians benefit from these individuals and agencies assisting us in providing safe, quality, affordable housing,” said KHC’s CEO Richard L. McQuady.  “KHC cannot do it alone, and we are proud to call all of those who work with us ‘partners.’”

Kentucky Housing would also like to recognize this year’s pint-size winners from KHC’s 2011 “My Own Kentucky Home” Art Contest.  All promotional materials for the 2011 Kentucky Affordable Housing Conference used artwork submitted by children across the state for previous years’ contests, which awards children in three age groups.  In 2011, the winners were Courtney Lynn Scott, from Louisville, Kentucky, for the 10-12 age group; Sadie Wilkerson, from Owensboro, Kentucky, for the 7-9 age group; and Wolfsion Goff, from Shelbyville, Kentucky, for the 6 and under age group. 

-30-


www.kyhousing.org

Kentucky Housing Corporation, the state housing finance agency, was created by the 1972 General Assembly to provide affordable housing opportunities.  As a self-supporting, public corporation, Kentucky Housing offers lower-than-market rate home mortgages, housing production financing, homeownership education/counseling, rental assistance, housing rehabilitation, and supportive housing programs for special needs populations.

Kentucky Housing Corporation prohibits discrimination in employment based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity, ancestry, age, disability, or veteran status