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As the partial federal government shutdown continues, KHC is committed to supporting those who rely on our programs for their housing needs, and we will continue our work to meet these needs. For more information about the shutdown, please visit the Impact of Partial Federal Government Shutdown page on KHC’s website.
 

News/Events

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Results of Annual Homeless Count Announced

FRANKFORT, Ky.— Kentucky Housing Corporation (KHC) released the results of the 2016 K-Count, a “point-in-time” count of homeless Kentuckians living on the streets, in emergency shelters, or other temporary housing programs in the Balance of State (118 counties outside of Fayette and Jefferson) during a single night. Due to separate funding streams, Louisville and Lexington conduct their own counts.
 
The count, conducted on January 27, 2016, identified 2,057 homeless men, women, and children. Of these, 28 percent were unsheltered, which represents a decrease in the number of persons unsheltered compared to 2015.
 
While the overall number was down slightly over 2015, the sharpest decline was among homeless veterans, which decreased by 30 percent. This reduction is attributable to an increased effort across the state to end homelessness among veterans.
 
The number of homeless has been declining since 3,446 were reported in 2010, the highest number reported in Kentucky’s Balance of State in the past six years.
 
“The issues causing persons to experience homelessness are often complex, and the long-term costs of homelessness can be significant to communities,” said Kathy Peters, executive director of KHC. “The availability of affordable housing remains a critical component to both preventing homelessness and getting people rehoused as quickly as possible. Through our homeless services and our work in increasing and preserving affordable housing options, I am proud of the efforts made by KHC and partners across the state impacting the lives of Kentuckians, giving them solutions and hope.” Ms. Peters continued, “Every person’s story is different, but through our joint efforts, including vital partnerships between housing providers and mainstream supportive service providers, we can help Kentucky families.”